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GOT A GRANDCHILD WHO LOVES SCIENCE? If the answer is yes, you may want to check out Frontiers for Young Minds, a new neuroscience journal edited by kids for kids.

This free monthly online journal tackles a wide variety of subjects, such as the relationship between the brain and sports and how our brain reacts when we discover we have a good reputation on Facebook.

Young people from eight to 15 can apply by email to be paired up with a scientist who will help them through the process of editing a neuroscience paper.

The journal is the brainchild of Dr. Bob Knight, a professor of psychology and neuroscience at the University of California, Berkeley. The aim is to engage the next wave of young scientists.

The official launch of the journal is set for April 2014.

 

 

SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES ON THE RISE IN RETIREMENT COMMUNITIES: According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more older people are getting sexually transmitted diseases (S.T.D.) than ever before.

Between 2007 and 2011, chlamydia infections among Americans 65 and over increased by 31 per cent. Syphilis increased by 52 per cent in the same age group.

Also, studies show fewer older adults use condoms. According to the 2010 National Survey of Sexual Health and Behavior, condoms are used in about six per cent of sexual encounters, among those 61 and older. Among college-age Americans, that number jumps to 40 per cent.

Writing in the New York Times, Dr. Ezekiel Emanuel said the S.T.D. numbers demand older adults take notice. He recommends:

  • physicians discuss sexual health with older patients
  • safe sex counseling for residents of retirement communities and assisted living facilities
  • condoms be readily available in these facilities, and
  • a safe sex campaign aimed at older people.

 

 
The Religioin of One's Own
GUIDE: CREATING PERSONAL SPIRITUALITY: In A Religion of One’s Own, Thomas Moore argues a secular-only approach to life ignores the mystery at the heart of life, selling human beings short.

The renowned author of Care of the Soul explores the myriad possibilities of creating a personal spiritual life, either inside or outside a religious tradition.

Offering lots of practical suggestions, Moore shows how we can learn from the natural world, religious traditions, and the arts to fashion an intelligent and openhearted response to life.

This original work points to the spiritual and the secular as two sides of the same coin, deriving spiritual fortitude from disparate sources.

Moore’s favourite guides and resources include:

  • the Tao Te Ching
  • the Gospels
  • stories of the Greek gods and goddesses
  • teaching of the Zen masters
  • Native American epic songs and tales
  • the writings of the New England transcendentalists
  • the practice of psychotherapy
  • the work of Carl Jung, James Hillman
  • the poems of Jane Hirshfield, Rainer Maria Rilke and the Sufis
  • the plays of Samuel Beckett
  • the paintings of Georgia O’ Keeffe, and
  • the music of Glenn Gould.

 

 

GRANDMOTHERS SERVE COMFORT AT THE NANA CAFE: Customers head to the Nana cafe for heartwarming homemade stews, sandwiches and freshly baked cakes at affordable prices. To top it off, the cafe in London (U.K.) is staffed by volunteers over the age of 60, who bring a lifetime of nurturing skills to the table.

After three months on the job, each "nana" can join the NANA partnership and receive a share of the profits based on the number of shifts worked.

Plans are afoot to host craft classes in knitting, sewing, crocheting and embroidery.

According to Nana founder, 29-year-old Katie Harris, the social enterprise is about breaking down barriers between young and old.

The project has been a lifesaver for Anindita Greco, a cook and single mother of three grown children. She welcomes the opportunity to be more involved in the community. "Here I can talk and share my skills," she said.

"The Nanas even give mums a well-earned break while they eat their soup and sandwich," Harris remarked. "This isn’t a one-way street. It’s an exchange of experience."

The nana cafe transforms at night into a bar serving craft beers and wines.

Source: guardian.com